American Alligator

DESCRIPTION

American alligators range from long and slender to short and robust, due to variations in factors like growth rate, diet and climate.

They have broad snouts, especially in captive individuals. When the jaws are closed, the edge of the upper jaws covers the lower teeth which fit into the jaws’ depressions. The teeth number from 74–84.

Dorsally, adult alligators may be olive, brown, gray or black in color while their undersides are cream colored.

HABITAT

American alligators are only found in the Southeastern United States, from Great Dismal Swamp in North Carolina, south to Everglades National Park in Florida and west to the southern tip of Texas.

Alligators inhabit swamps, streams, rivers, ponds and lakes. Females and juveniles are also found in Carolina Bays and other seasonal wetlands.

DIET

The American alligator is considered the apex predator throughout its range.

They are opportunists and their diet is determined largely by both the size and age of the predating alligator and the size and availability of prey.

Most alligators will eat a wide variety of animals, including invertebrates, fish, birds, turtles, snakes, amphibians and mammals, in their life cycle.

WHERE DO THEY LIVE?

american alligators

CONSERVATION STATUS

red-list-status